Paul Gibson’s Hull and East Yorkshire History

A Short History of Bishop Lane & Bishop Lane Staithe

Rosemary Horrox did admirable research on the town rental records (1) and listed information on most of the property in the old town area. To the uninformed or the beginner however, the information can appear dense and is limited in its use without other corroborating data (although Rosemary did regard her excellent work only as a guide). For this reason I have chosen to try and analyse only two properties within Horrox plot 19 in any detail, with a brief over-view of the rest of the area within the plot. The properties I have chosen are nos.1-2 Bishop Lane and no.40 High Street.

Hollars Plan of 1640

1 – Street development

During the 14th and 15th centuries when the streets of Hull became fully developed, areas of land that had been single plots were sub-divided. Several shops or dwelling houses were often built at the front of what had been a single property frontage. “Houses were being extended into their garden ground, or built out above the streets and lanes; more and more houses were being squeezed into the old plots; and several shops might occupy the street front of a single messuage” (2) . Bishop Lane was no exception- it’s south side had been a single plot stretching from the river to Lowgate until as late as 1347. The plots north of Bishop Lane retained their large equal length size after- most of the others within the town were sub-divided. This may be attributed to the land originally having been owned almost in its entirety by the De La Pole family until 1513 when it was seized by the crown. The Poll Tax records from 1377 showed a total of 43 households in Bishop Lane with an adult population of 68 (3). However, Hollar’s plan of Hull in 1640 appeared to show considerably less than 43 properties some 300 years later and this raises doubts to the authenticity of his plan. It is of course possible that property was demolished and/or several households were within each property.

Bishop or Bishop’s Lane originally ran from High Street through to the junction with Land of Green Ginger. Bishop Lane had previously been known as Bishopgate (4) and later became known as Denton Lane. (Hollar’s plan of Hull in 1640 showed it as Denton Lane). Rosemary Horrox recorded a tenement belonging to Robert de Denton on the north-east side of Bishopgate in 1330 and in 1383 it was mentioned in the town rentals as Denton Lane. The west side, beyond Lowgate, became known as Bowlalley Lane in the late 18th Century. Bowlalley Lane was named due to there having been a green for playing bowls within the grounds of a manor house that was once situated there.

It was mentioned in a newspaper advertisement in 1787 when it was described as “a clean and retired street nearly in the centre of the town of Kingston upon Hull, with every requisite, out-office, and a spacious garden behind the same”. (5)

Bishop Lane Staith was first mentioned in the town rentals as Bishop Staith in 1392. Most of the entries or alleys leading to the river Hull from High Street (or Hull Street, as it was known at that time) were mentioned by name for the first time following the town rental of 1347. The lanes often took their names from the common staiths themselves, which pre-dated the streets and were therefore named earlier. The streets and staithes usually took their names from the owner of the staithe. The fact that they were mentioned in the rentals of 1347 could suggest that it was around that time that they were first built upon.

2 – 40 High Street

All of the land to the east of High Street was little more than a working quay until the early years of the 14th Century. At that point property was first built on the land opposite the existing property on the west side of the street.

 

Bishop Lane Staith June 2000

Excavations at Chapel Lane Staith in 1977 revealed that the original west bank of the River Hull was only 8 metres east of the line of High Street itself (6). This gives a clear impression of exactly how much land was reclaimed from the river and consequently built upon.

The plot of land upon which No.40 High Street is built was noted in the town rentals in May 1392. “John Colthorpe to John Tutbury, two tenements late of Thomas de Swynflete, one of which is in Hull Street (bounded by; a tenement called La Lyon to the south, Bishop Staith to the north and the street and the river to the west and east)” (7).

The same land later owned (circa 1548) by merchant John Thornton was divided again before the end of the 16th Century. At the time of the division the piece to the north contained; “one larder, a kitchen, a brewhouse, half a cellar, one long cellar, and a grain house, together with all the buildings on both sides of the entry which have been regarded as belonging to the property in the last 12 years” (8). John Thornton also owned the land on the opposite (west) side of High Street and had stabling there. (This could have been the later Dunwell’s Forge/Stewart’s Yard as this was the only area near enough that had room for stable buildings).

Curiously, Hollar’s plan of Hull in 1640 showed a row of 7 or 8 properties spanning the plot north to south from the street to the river. This does not tie-in with the information in Horrox’ research and casts doubt on the accuracy of Hollar’s plan. The last of these properties faced High Street, and did appear to show a central arched entrance which may be the same building shown on the later Ordnance Survey plan in 1853. The Goad’s fire insurance plan of the 1880s did not show the building to be of “brick and timber”, but they did miss other brick and timber buildings (e.g. Dunwell’s Forge) in their surveys. The buildings Hollar showed would seem to have been drawn with a degree of artistic licence, with the exception of the High Street property. The property fronting High Street from the east appears to have been divided north and south from the earliest records.

With the exception of plans such as Hollar’s, records between 1600 and the late 1770s are few and it was not until the historian Hadley made a survey of the “staiths and frontsteads” in High Street in 1772-73 that any more details of the plot came to light. Hadley’s survey was matched with a survey of the east side of High Street by Joseph Page and John Broughton in March 1772, by modern-day historians Ivan and Elizabeth Hall (9). Both confirmed that at the time of the survey the land on “plot 19” belonged to the “King’s Coffee House” to the south and Alderman Cookson and Captain Keld to the north (staith) side.

Historian James Sheahan, writing of High Street in 1863 (10) noted:

“No.40, opposite Bishop Lane, was the “King’s Coffee House” within memory, and the Commercial-room of that hostelry is now occupied as an office by Mr. C.H.Knapp. The windows of this apartment contain some diamond scratchings of the “commercials” of the time when William Pitt had much to do with the destiny of our empire. The King’s Coffee House has sunk in the scale of inns, and its business is now carried on in the back part of the house. These premises belonged to the Crowle family; and, in a lease of the adjoining house, Oct.1777, it is described as “heretofore in the occupation of Alderman Cookson.” The house is now the property of – Wilson, Esq., of Dalham Tower, Westmoreland, a descendant of the Crowles”(sic). This would seem to confirm Hadley’s survey.

Bishop Lane Staith map.

The only gap then between the northern buildings was the one that remained in the form of a covered entrance also shown on the plan, which was eventually built over. An entrance from High Street directly between the north and south of the plot formed a permanent, natural boundary (along the dividing line of the two sections, which had been in place since before the end of the 16th Century- see earlier). It led to the yard and “privvies” attached to the other building facing the street, which later became known as the King’s Coffee House. As a hostelry of whatever sort the King’s Coffee House would have needed open space to the rear for toilet facilities and storage. For this reason the gap survived as a small courtyard with privies until the buildings were demolished at the end of the 19th Century. It seems likely that the King’s Coffee House would have been the site of some sort of commercial drinking establishment for many years prior to its first entry in the trade directories in 1791 (deeds are available for the property prior to 1772). It is entirely plausible that it had been so since the plot was divided north and south. It may have been an alehouse or some similar establishment before becoming known as a coffee-house.

The rise in popularity of the coffee-house in England at the end of the 17th Century was widespread following its emergence predominantly in London and the university towns in the 1660s. Following the introduction of tea in the 1650s and a fall in the price of coffee, coffee-houses became popular for the more well-to-do and often intellectuals in most cities and towns (12).

It should be noted that coffee-houses were often not what they seemed. Defoe, writing in1714 noted of coffee-houses that “when you come into them they are but alehouses, only they think the name of coffee-house gives a better air” (13). They were places where a meal and a drink could be had (often converted eating-houses, sometimes referred to as “chop-houses”) as well as a game or two and more often than not sold ale and spirits. The modern equivalent could be seen as the licensed café. As Sheahan suggested; by the1860s coffee-houses had had their day and the King’s Coffee House became the lowly King’s Arms, a common alehouse. When Sheahan wrote of the King’s Coffee House in 1863 he spoke of the “Commercial-Room” of the hostelry “now being used as an office”. The trade directories listed the coffee-house as No.41 High Street until the early 1840s when it became No.40. These two pieces of information if considered together may suggest that the coffee-house originally took-up the property on both sides of the arched High Street entry. This could strengthen the argument for the building shown on the Hollar plan to have been the King’s Coffee House. The 1861 Census gave little information listing in Bishop Lane Staith, the King’s Coffee House. John Park, head of household, and a publican by trade. Also present at the time of the Census were a housekeeper and 2 lodgers.

The King’s Arms as it became known from around 1867 (14), closed circa 1876 and the former drinking rooms were taken over and used by a variety of businesses; merchants, importers, etc. who had already occupied the other rooms and the warehouse to the rear for many years. The Goad’s fire insurance plan of the mid-1880s showed the rooms of the former King’s Arms to be “vacant” and the rear portion of the building marked as “ruins”.

Victuallers of the King’s Coffee House, from some trade directory entries:

1791-03

John Carter

King’s Coffee House

High Street

1806

Thomas Carter

King’s Coffee House

High Street

1810

Robert Barnby

King’s Coffee House

High Street

1817

Robert Tonge

King’s Coffee House

41 High Street

1822-23

Matthew Botterill

King’s Coffee House

41 High Street

1826

William Short

King’s Coffee House

41 High Street

1834

Richard Goforth

King’s Coffee House

High Street

1840-46

William Coates

King’s Coffee House

41 High Street

1851

William Burton

King’s Coffee House

40 High Street

1858-63

J. Park

King’s Coffee House

40 High Street

1867

George Hairsine

King’s Coffee House

40 High Street

1874-76

Henry Richardson

King’s Arms

40 High Street

PacificClub

Circa 1898/99 the whole of the site, back to the old warehouse was cleared (was it all demolished? Was the existing rear warehouse redeveloped?) and gradually rebuilt as The Pacific Club, to the designs of the firm of architects B.S. Jacobs in nearby Bowlalley Lane. Architect Antony Blackmore writing in 1977 recalled that his grandfather did most of the design work on the Pacific. Although the building has the date 1899 in its terracotta front it actually opened in May 1901 (15). It seems that the date 1899 refers to the formation of the company The Pacific Ltd., and not the building itself (16). Mr. Blackmore noted that from sketches in his possession it was clear that “as a first stage the street frontage and the entrance and staircase portion of the building had been completed in the first years of this century”. He also recalled “that in 1909 he (his grandfather) worked on its extension back to the River Hull, adding the large Trading Hall, the Corn Trade riverside Board Room now bar, and four floors of kitchens, offices, lavatories and storerooms” (17). It would seem the Pacific was an ongoing project and was not entirely finished until 1910.

The Pacific Club bar 1977

The Pacific was initially set up as a trading exchange for grain and oil seeds and prospered, in the heady days prior to the outbreak of World War One. This was the peak of Hull’s industrial and economic growth. The name Pacific was probably chosen, as there was already a Baltic Exchange in London and an Atlantic Exchange in Liverpool. Millers, seed-crushers, merchants and brokers would all attend on a daily basis with the grand trading floor packed with as many as a hundred traders. Trading members wore hats on the floor whilst professional members (non-traders) removed them. Usually offers of grain and seed came from London and a line of fifteen “trunk” telephone boxes and two for local calls on one side of the trading hall enabled constant contact between the other exchanges. Business continued as usual at the Pacific throughout World War One and forces stationed in Hull were made honorary members. Following the outbreak of World War Two the Ministry of Food took control of all feedstuffs and oils. The merchants and brokers became distribution agents for the Ministry who imported the raw materials and allocated produce to the mills at a fixed price. The Ministry retained control for nine years following the war and this had an effect on the merchants and brokers many of whom went out of business. A static market meant trading in Hull declined drastically. From the late 1950s the Pacific was used mainly as a business luncheon club although office facilities remained. In the late 1970s it was sold and survived by the skin of its teeth as a variety of clubs. One of these became a sports/squash club with onsite facilities and the grand trading floor was sadly used as a squash court. Following sale at a later auction the rear warehouse was converted along with its neighbour at 38/39 High Street into accommodation, predominantly for students. The ornate front and offices are still used and the building now has a Grade II listing (from 1993?) and enjoys some protection from further redevelopment.

The Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas Act approved list gave the following description (680-1/23/184, 21/09/93) in their usual mundane fashion in September 1993 :-

“Former office, now club. Dated 1899. By BS Jacobs. Brick with rusticated ashlar plinth and terracotta dressings, with gabled, hipped and mansard slate roofs, partly glazed.

Pacific and Hitchcock's, June 2000.

Renaissance Revival style. Ground-floor sill band, polychrome string courses, second-floor cornice. 2 storeys plus attics; 4 x 7 windows. Projecting central double bay with coped gable flanked by pilasters. Two 3-light double transomed cross casements with leaded glazing. Above, 4 plain sashes and above again, 2 smaller windows. In the gable peak, a coat of arms. Below, to right, a doorcase with heavily rusticated pilasters and triangular pediment with a coat of arms. Moulded round-arched doorway with keystone and enriched spandrels. To left a 3-light cross-mullioned window with leaded glazing and above it, a relief panel with a coat of arms. To right, a recessed bay with a full height square oriel window, with a tall 4-light mullioned and transomed casement, with Ipswich glazing bars at the bottom, and leaded glazing. Above, 4 small plain sashes, and to right a recess with a smaller window. To left a recessed entrance bay with a canted 2-storey oriel window with coped parapet. Single cross casement and above, 2 plain sashes. Below, a square-headed cart entry. Rear range, fronting Bishop Lane Staith, has the first floor clad in white glazed brick. To left a 2-storey block with 4 large round-arched glazing bar windows carried up into the partly glazed mansard roof. In front of the windows, a full-width metal tank. Below, 4 square blocked windows. To right, a higher 2-storey block with a hipped roof topped with a metal ventilator. 3 wood-framed Diocletian windows. Below, a single-storey lean-to projection with 3 segment-headed openings.”(sic)

Nikolaus Pevsner described the building simply as “Red brick with a wealth of terracotta details. Oriel and other windows with mullions and transoms” (18).

3 – No.1 Bishop Lane

The town rentals stated that Robert de Percy held the plot of land along the south side of Bishopgate in 1293. Later in 1320 Robert de Burton paid rental on a plot of land “which he had built upon” on the south side of Bishop Lane. These references can be seen as a date for the earliest building work on the south side of Bishop Lane. The Archbishop of York held one tenement in Bishopgate in 1347 with “a High Street frontage of 25 feet”, which can be assumed to be the site of No.1 and possibly No.2 Bishop Lane. The tenement may well have been the arched property shown on Hollar’s plan of 1640, which straddled the east-end of Bishop Lane from north to south (19).

High Street looking south, 1888 sketch by F. S. Smith.

The photograph shown on the left dates from around 1900 and shows High Street looking south, with the entrance to Bishop Lane on the right. The buildings in the foreground on the right appear similar in design to Dunwell’s Forge, which remains just south of the junction; Dunwell’s Forge was originally ‘jettied’ in the same way as these buildings appear to be. Historian Chris Ketchell and his students discovered that it was timber-framed and one of Hull’s oldest medieval buildings. Chris discovered more buildings of this design at 158/159 High Street, further north beyond these buildings, that were also timber-framed - sadly these were allowed to be demolished rather than preserved. At some point, probably in the latter part of the 18th Century (20) the ‘arched tenement’ at the end of Bishop Lane was demolished and the extant buildings, now nos.1 and 2 Bishop Lane, were built on the south side of the site forming the ‘new’ corner of Bishop Lane. The buildings shown in the photograph on the north side bear a plaque dated 1815, which is likely to have been the date of rebuilding of this side of the old site, but as these buildings appear to show the remains of jettying, I think it is more likely that they were simply adapted and remodelled rather than completely rebuilt, and what we see in the photograph is the remains of the original ‘tenement’ that originally ran across the end of Bishop Lane.

The new No.1 Bishop Lane was occupied by a variety of tradesmen and merchants following its construction or rebuilding. It is likely that it was built as private house rather than business premises although it could have served both purposes. From around 1851 the number of businesses that held offices at No.1 increased gradually and this could mean that it was no longer used for living accommodation from that point. There never seems to have been more than three businesses using No.1 at any given time, which would suggest that they each occupied a whole floor. The earliest trade directories rarely used house numbers, as at that time it was not an obligation to actually mark your property. Following an act of parliament in 1810 it became a statutory requirement:

“That the said commissioners shall and they are hereby directed and required to cause the names of the several streets, squares, lanes, ways, passages, courts and public places within the said town and liberty, and lordship or precinct, to be painted in large black roman letters, on a white ground, in some conspicuous part of every corner house thereof, and to cause each house in every such street, square, lane, way, passage and public place to be numbered progressively from one end thereof to the other on each side thereof respectively, in and by distinct figures painted upon or over the door of every such house” (21).

From around this date the trade directories began to use numbering more frequently. No.1 High Street however, was rarely mentioned and less so in conjunction with No.2. It is equally difficult to pin-down a property to either the south or north side until the numbering began and so the early directories listed all inhabitants as simply Bishop Lane. There may have been confusion in the early numbering and even today it is easy to think of No.1 Bishop Lane as also having a High Street address. Is it possible that the arched tenement over the east end of Bishop Lane survived into the 19th Century and that this caused the confusion? Evidence on a postcard to… Consequently it is difficult to recognise the earliest residents No.1 and of the other properties in Bishop Lane until numbering became firm around 1810 to 1815. Plans of the property in the area are also sadly few and far between. Much of the property was of a poor quality and early buildings required no planning permission and went unrecorded until the 1830s.

It is safe to say that from an early date the residents of the first property on the south-east corner of Bishop Lane were merchants of one sort or another. There were some references to No.1 in the directories of 1806/7 and 1814 as a “pub” of some sort but it is possible that these were erroneous and actually referred to No.2 Bishop Lane. No.1 would seem to have been a grand residence for a tailor (Sloop Clothier) or a common alehouse at that time. It is possible that No.1 may have been a coffee-house or more controversially, that the present No.1 Bishop Lane was not “re-built” until circa 1810-15 and this caused the early confusion in its numbering and that of No.2 (22).

From the 1820s the property was occupied continually by corn merchants and ships agents or brokers, for at least the next 140 years. (Why do No.1 and No.2 have basements?) At some point, probably in the years before the First World War, No.1 was extended to include No.2, and again possibly in its first conversion to a club of some sort.

The fashion for discotheques was at its peak in the late 1960s and property in the old-town would have been at its lowest price for any prospective buyer. In 1970 plans were submitted for an extension to the “Bishop Lane Club” which involved the development of former property in Stewart’s Yard, to the south of the original buildings of No.2 Bishop Lane. These were completed in December of 1970 just in time for Christmas. During the 1970s the Bishop Lane Club catered for the younger market and was known amongst other things as “Temptations” and the more memorable “Bier Keller” which it remained until the late 1970s. By the end of the 1970s (1980?) No.1 and No.2 High Street were part of a group of buildings, which also included the former Dunwell’s Forge next door on High Street. Under the name of Montagues Club, the former front building of the former Dunwell’s Forge had become the “Forge Bar”, with the disc jockey sat directly in front of the old forge chimney. Above this in former offices was a wine bar that had its entrance from the tunnel entrance to Stewart’s Yard. The main entrance to Montagues was via No.1 Bishop Lane whilst the “downstairs dancefloor” was the former No.2 Bishop Lane, the original entrance to No.2 being used as a fire escape.

Montagues had gone by the end of the 1980s and the “Hull Food Restaurant” took over after vacating their former premises in Charles Street in 1991. Initially opening at weekends only the select menu later became available on occasional weeknights. The restaurant theme has remained and No.1 Bishop Lane is now Hitchcock’s, another vegetarian restaurant. Some of the second floor rooms are used as flats but appear to remain vacant for most of the time.

The building now has limited protection in the form of its Grade II Listed Building status (680-1/23/66, 13/10/52) and is described as:-

“House, now restaurant (disused at time of survey). Late C18, with mid C19 and late C20 alterations. Brick, whitewashed, with stone dressings and hipped pantile roof with single side wall and party stacks. Plinth, moulded wooden eaves, gutter and brackets. 3 storeys plus basement; 5 x 3 windows. Windows have corbelled sills. On the first floor, a plain sash to left and 4 barred 12-pane sashes to right. Above, 2 top-hung casements and three 9-pane sashes. Below, a central round-arched doorway with rendered doorcase and concrete steps to a C20 door. On either side, two 12-pane sashes. Basement has to left, 2 blocked openings and to right 2 small board doors, all with segmental heads. Left return, to High Street, has 3 reglazed 12-pane sashes and above, a 9-pane sash flanked to right by 2 top-hung casements. Below, a central blank flanked by single barred plain sashes. Basement has 2 low flat-headed board doors” (sic). However, it does not appear to be the busiest of premises and is now in a poor state of repair with many missing areas of rendering and loose and missing bricks. Some windows look near to collapse structurally and the gutters are overgrown. I fear that more than listed building status will be required to protect this building.

Select residents of no.1 from the trade directories:

1826M.Laverack & Son, corn merchant
R.Cook, agent and ships insurer
1838Frederick Tootal, corn merchant
Robert Cook, agent and ships insurer
1846Edward Hall, merchant
Robert Cook, broker and agent
1851Edward Hall, corn and seed merchant, res. Medley Street
William Claybourn, broker, commission agent, res. Drypool
1863Wm. Kelsey, corn factor
Wm. Rawson & James Robinson, importers of wood hoops, rushes, willows 
John Moor, corn and seed factor
1876T. Suddaby, seed crusher
T. Suddaby Jnr., corn factor
Wm. Beecroft, corn merchant
Corrie & Hill
Rawson & Robinson, merchants
1885Wm. Beecroft, corn merchant
Thos Suddaby, seed crusher and corn factor
Redfern & Chatterton, seed, oil and cake brokers
1892Wm. Beecroft, corn factor
Thos. Suddaby, corn factor
Redfern & Chatterton, cake brokers
1915Shipton, Anderson & Co., corn merchants
Redfern & Chatterton, cake brokers, 1 & 2 Bishop Lane
1916Shipton, Anderson & Co., corn merchants, 1 & 2 Bishop Lane

4 – No.2 Bishop Lane

No.2 Bishop Lane was closely associated with No.1 for most of the 20th Century, having been structurally altered to become part of No.1 at ground and first floor level probably before the First World War. Early references are few and far between as for most of the old town properties and it is not until the trade directories of the early 19th Century that firm evidence can be found. It is likely that the first reference in the trade directories is in 1791 when Joseph Waltham was listed as a victualler at an un-named alehouse in Bishop Lane. Clayton’s 1803 directory listed Robert Tankersley as a taylor (sic) and slopseller (one who makes ready-made clothes) in High Street. By the time of Battle’s 1806/7 directory Robert Tankersley was listed as a tailor and victualler at No.1 Bishop Lane. Allowing for the confusion re- the numbering at this corner this could be taken as the first reference to the Sloop Clothier, an alehouse listed as No.2 Bishop Lane in the subsequent directories.

An advertisement appeared in the Hull Advertiser on the 10th December 1808:-

“TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

By Mr John Jackson

Upon the premises on Wednesday, December 14, 1808 at three o’clock in the afternoon, subject to such conditions of sale as shall be then and there produced.

All that Capital, Substantial, and well finished PUBLIC HOUSE known by the sign of the Sloop CLOTHIER, situate on the south side of Bishop Lane, in the town of Kingston Upon Hull, adjoining to the corner house in High Street, and now in the occupation of Mrs. Thompson. Great part of the purchase money may remain on security of the premises, at interest for a term of ten years, if required by the purchaser.

For particulars apply at the office of Mr. J. Day, Conveyancer, Water-works Street; or of the Auctioneer,
No. 26 Bond Street.” (sic)

This would seem to confirm all the suggested evidences. The original/earliest mentioned victualler at the property had named his premises after his trade. It is evident that he made and sold “ready to wear” clothing for the crews of the many Keels and Sloops that sailed the nearby River Hull and River Humber. Or was it a corruption of his trade- was it intended to have been the Slop-Clothier? From 1826 the name began to change and around 1834 it became known as the Queen’s Coffee House, a nod in the direction of the King’s Coffee House across High Street and the newly crowned Queen Victoria. Coffee-houses were common in this part of the old town as they were often the resort of those presuming to be intellectuals and the vast numbers of solicitors and merchants would surely have provided many customers.

The 1851 Census (23) listed William Dunwell (born Hull) aged 48 as innkeeper and head of the household with his 3 children and wife all living on site. Also present and presumably therefore also living-in, were a solicitor, ropemaker and a copper plate printer. None of these were listed as lodgers but cannot definitely be assumed to have been resident at No.2. The 1861 Census (24) also listed Mr.Dunwell as a victualler. But with no other family members and 3 lodgers listed at the time of survey.

From the late 1870s the coffee-house became simply an alehouse with a full licence, which it held until closure circa 1909 at which time it was a Worthington & Co. tied house. Its closure, as was the case with most of the pubs in the old town at that time, was a direct consequence of the Balfour Licensing Act of 1904. At the time of closure the owners claimed £1345 in compensation, but as was usually the case were paid a reduced sum of only £650 (25).

Following its closure it was occupied by a variety of merchants and became part of the shared offices of No.1 Bishop Lane from which time merchants where listed as Nos. 1 & 2 Bishop Lane. Its links with No.1 continued and as No.1 became a club in the 1960s (1950s?) the floor plan of No.2 changed accordingly. Gradually it lost its own identity and even its entrance, which became a fire escape for the club. It too has acquired grade II listed building status (680-1/23/67, 12/11/73) yet interestingly its description suggests it to be of an earlier date (Is this correct?) than No.1:

“House, now disused warehouse. Mid C18, with late 20C alterations. Brick, whitewashed, with painted ashlar dressings and pantile roof. Plinth, moulded wooden eaves, gutter and brackets. Windows have corbelled sills. 3 storeys plus attics; 3- window range. Three 12-pane sashes, the left one barred, and above, 3 top-hung casements. Above again, a box dormer. Below, largely rebuilt ground floor with central plain sash, reduced in height and with a C20 door below it. To left, a plain sash, and to right, a C20 double door with overlight.” (sic) Again, as with No.1, No.2 is in a sorry state of repair and needs urgent attention.

Select victuallers from trade directories etc:

[1791, Joseph Waltham, victualler, location unknown-Bishop Lane]?

1806/7Robert Tankersleytailor & victualler1 Bishop Lane
1808Hull Advertiser 10.12.1808Sloop Clothier2 Bishop Lane
1814Thomas Capesvictualler1 Bishop Lane
1817-23Angus MacdonaldSloop Clothier2 Bishop Lane
1826P. AddamNeptune2 Bishop Lane
1831possibly renamed Greenland Tavern?
1834Elizabeth ShimmellsQueen’s Coffee House2 Bishop Lane
1838-40George WilsonQueen’s Coffee House2 Bishop Lane
1846Betsy WestwandQueen’s Coffee House2 Bishop Lane
1851-68Wm. Dunwell
Was this the Dunwell of nearby Dunwell’s Forge?
Queen’s Coffee House2 Bishop Lane
1874D. BondQueen’s Coffee House2 Bishop Lane
1876Charles Henry BridgesQueen’s Tavern2 Bishop Lane
1885Henry BlairQueen’s Head Inn2 Bishop Lane
1892Edward Emanuel ApplebyQueen’s Head2 Bishop Lane
1895Joseph SumptonQueen’s Head2 Bishop Lane
1899Mary A HockneyQueen’s Head2 Bishop Lane
1901W. MilsonQueen’s Head2 Bishop Lane
1907-09John George MillerQueen’s Head2 Bishop Lane
1915Micks, Lambert & Co., corn merchants
1916Redfern & Chatterton, cake brokers,
Micks Lambert & Co., corn merchants
1 & 2 Bishop Lane

5 – Some other Bishop Lane properties and pubs

The rather grand properties at no.1 and no.2 Bishop Lane give the impression that the whole of the property in the lane was of this quality, but this was not the case. Originally the whole length of the south-side of the lane would most likely have been of the quality and design of the extant no.14 whose listed building description suggests that it is of the late 17th Century. As the residents stature increased, and the lane became a predominantly business rather than residential area, the quality of the buildings increased. From the early years of the 19th Century a large number of drinking establishments appeared in Bishop Lane as in many of the other streets of the old town (only the queen’s coffee house had been in existence prior to the 19th Century). For some reason all of them were on the south side of the lane.

Following on from the Queens Head at No.2 in a westerly direction, here is a brief account of the other properties on the south side of Bishop Lane;

No.3, which had a rather ordinary past and following its probable rebuilding in the late 18th or early 19th Century was a private residence and the home of “family school mistress” Louisa Hewitt for 20 years prior to becoming another house of merchant’s offices in the 1830s. Initially a similar building to No.2, also of 3 storeys (as shown below in a photograph of the 1940s- note no double yellow lines). At the time of writing it is converted to sad looking flats as Nos.3, 3a and 3b of which only No.3 appears to be inhabited.

Nos. 4, 5 and 6 are currently one block known as Carlton Chambers with such topical occupants as WEB Images Ltd. The 1853 Ordnance Survey Plan gave a different picture, clearly showing them to be the three smallest dwelling houses in the lane, possibly one-up and one-down. Circa 1885 the three were rebuilt (re-fronted?) in their present style. A very pleasing block with detailed tie-rod heads (from re-fronting?), corbelled windowsills, dentilated eaves details, brick guttering, ornate keystones and smart brick string-course.

Bishop Lane in the 1940s

No.7 was known for most of the 19th Century as a pub. It had probably been a simple dwelling house prior to this. Local artist F.S Smith sketched Bishop Lane circa 1885 and showed nos.7 to 10 as a continuation of the small buildings mentioned at nos.4, 5 and 6.From circa 1814 it was known as an alehouse with its first listed victualler being the aptly named Samuel Smith. Possibly originally known as the Norfolk Tavern or the Custom House Tavern it was known from 1823 until its closure around 1876 as the Hope & Anchor.

The building survived with Nos. 8 and 9 until redevelopment in 1975 as a new office block by Worthshire Ltd, with work being completed 28 July 1975. The tidy building survives in good order and fits well into its surroundings, known as Wilberforce Chambers and currently completely occupied.

Some select victuallers of the former No.7 from trade directories:

[H.A. 18 July 1813, Custom House Tavern, Near High Street?]

1814

Samuel Smith
[H.A. 22 July 1815, Norfolk Tavern, vict. John Tindale, Bishop Lane?]

victualler

7 Bishop Lane

1817

William Jubb

victualler

7 Bishop Lane

1822-23

William Gilyatt

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

1826

William Wood

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

1834

William Suddaby

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

1840-46

Robert Beedham

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

1851

C. Binnington

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

1858

Elizabeth Tarn

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

1861-76

Rosetta Ferguson

Hope & Anchor

7 Bishop Lane

Nos.8 and 9 were in the same humble style as their neighbours to the east and their history is noted previously.

Nos.10, 10a and 11 to 13 have listed building status Grade II (680-1/23/68, 13/10/52), their listed building description stated:

“4 houses. c1750, restored late C20. Brick with ashlar dressings and pantile roofs. Wooden gutter and brackets. 3storeys; 16 window range. All windows have corbelled sills. Ground and first-floor windows are 12-pane sashes, some of them renewed, with brick flat arches and triple keystones. Second floor windows are C20 tilting casements with glazing bars. No.11 has 6 pane sashes. No.10a, to left, has a recessed fielded 6-panel door with overlight. To its right, a wooden doorcase with eared architrave and pediment, with fielded 6-panel door and glazing bar overlight, flanked by single windows. The other houses have similar off-centre doorcases flanked by a single window to left and 2 windows to right” (sic). This tells most of the story of these 4 properties, suffice to say they were occupied by a variety of trades-people. The 1851 and 1861 Census returns showed that there were often 2 or 3 families resident in each property. Initially as varied as music teachers and bookbinders they became occupied predominantly by solicitors and stockbrokers as the more common trades moved with their customers out of the old town. It is evident from the Census that the solicitors etc. lived or worked at these addresses only during the working week (26) and would most likely be at their more habitable addresses for the weekends.

No.12 was an exception to the rule with hardly any change in trade. It remained a bookbinder’s premises from around 1865 until at least the 1940s. The last firm, the Cherry family (descendants of the original Septimus Cherry who had been at No.22 Bishop Lane since the 1830s) occupied the property from at least 1867 until the end of the 1960s when there were still 3 bookbinders in Bishop Lane. At the time of writing, No.10 and 10 1/2 are two flats, No.11 is vacant, No.12 is offices and No.13 is TO LET.

“…a surprising place to find an attractive mid-C18 terrace of three-storey, four-bay houses (Nos.10-13)”, Pevsner.

No.14 is the last of the buildings on the south side of Bishop Lane to have listed building status Grade II (680-1/23/69, 08/07/81) and its description stated;

“House, now warehouse (disused at time of survey). Late C17, refronted mid C18, raised and altered mid C19, with C20alterations. Brick with corrugated iron roof with single brick gable and rear wall stacks and C19 iron ventilator in front slope. 2 storeys; 4-window range of segment-headed 16-pane sashes. Ground floor has a central pair of C20 board doors with a steel lintel, flanked to left by a C19 glazing bar shop window with pilasters and cornice under a relieving arch. To right, an unglazed segment-headed window.

14 Bishop Lane

At the rear, to left, a 2-storey single bay lean-to addition. Interior is said to contain C17 ovolo-moulded ceiling joists and C18 raised-and-fielded panelling and chimneypieces with plain raised surrounds.”(sic)

This rare survivor continues to hold on despite the determined efforts of its owners to leave it open at all times hoping some kind vandal will set it on fire and thus avoid the impending costs of further maintenance. I photographed it some years ago and it has declined and lost parts of its contents since then. It is difficult to assess when it was last occupied but ironically, from the beginning of the 19th Century it was occupied by builders and bricklayers for decades, which may have had some bearing on its structural survival. The listed, shop window is a remnant of its former life as a grocer’s shop circa 1860. A variety of further owners have come and gone in the ensuing years most of them using it as a small warehouse of sorts. Sadly it has also laid derelict for long stretches and continues to do so.

Rear of 14 BishopLane

Nos.15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 are now lost under the site of Estate Agents Larrard’s premises whose main entrance is on Lowgate. This western end of Bishop Lane was arched over in the same way as the east end at the junction with High Street. This could either signify a joint ownership of both sides of the lane or could simply have been a method of making the most of land , which was becoming short. The building shown on the site on Hollar’s plan of 1640, which spanned the two sides of the lane may have survived into the 18th Century and its outline lasted until the 19th Century. The 2 properties facing each other at the west end of Bishop Lane are shown on the 1853 Ordnance Survey Plan to have an almost symmetrical appearance. The original Nos.15 and 16, which were on the site became the premises if not the residence of many solicitors, auctioneers and bankers clerks. The Census returns did however show that families of lesser tradesmen rented the rooms either to the rear or above their premises. It seems shared property was common.

No.17 became a pub around the beginning of the 19th Century. In 1803 Robert Bainbridge was listed in a trade directory as the victualler of the Blue Bell, Bishop Lane. In the deeds of the property it was shown that the Blue Bell was demolished in 1803 (27). In the Hull Advertiser of 10th December 1804 a new pub was advertised which was “built on the site of the Blue Bell, Bishop Lane”. This new pub became known as the Bishop Lane Tavern. Later becoming another coffee-house, the (Royal) Union Coffee House before changing its name and clientele as the Telegraph Inn circa 1867. The Telegraph Inn was almost opposite the post office in Bishop Lane and the telegraph had come into common use in the 1860s, which may provide a reason for its change in name. It could possibly have been named after a coach but this is unlikely.

Number 17 BishopLane

In the era of the great adventurers the Telegraph became the Pioneer circa 1905, which it remained until its closure on the 11th December 1922. In June1904 the owners of the Pioneer Inn, R. Stephenson & Sons of Beverley began to paint an advertisement on the gable end of the premises without applying for permission and were duly stopped from finishing the work. In a list of licensed houses “within the docks” for the Hull Incorporation for the Poor in 1899 it was listed as owned by J. Stephenson and occupied by Robert Ward. It had been a Hull Brewery Co. pub and its license was transferred to make a full licence for the Wellington Inn, Russell Street. There were many confusing references to the pub in the trade directories and it appears to have been numbered 16, 17 and 18 at any one time. It did expand however, and around 1840 the original Nos.18 and 19 Bishop Lane was either demolished or altered to become a new enlarged No.17. This property was shown clearly on the Ordnance Survey plan of 1893. Nos. 14,15 and 16 were shown in error on the same plan as a pub. Theses premises were a wine and spirits merchant at the time belonging to Joe Beaumont, never trust a map! These details were confirmed by the Goad’s Fire Insurance plans of the 1880s. Plans drawn up in the mid 1920s for the Hull Incorporated Law Society for alterations to the property give a clue to how the Pioneer public house may have looked.

Select victuallers from some trade directories

1803

Robert Bainbridge

Blue Bell

Bishop Lane

1802/3

Robert Baimbridge

Bishop Lane Tavern

Bishop Lane

1806/7

Robert Bainbridge

victualler

Bishop Lane

1807

Ship Tavern

Bishop Lane

1812

“to be let”-H.A. 4.4.1812

Ship & Grapes

Bishop Lane

1812

“re-naming”-H.A. 19.12.1812

1813

1813 Yorkshire Arms Tavern

1814

William Smith & Adolphus Gray

victuallers

16 Bishop Lane

1817

William Wilson

Yorkshire Arms Tavern

16 Bishop Lane

1822-23

John Watson

Union Coffee House

16 Bishop Lane

1826

John Shaw vict.

Three Tuns

18 Bishop Lane

1834

1834

Union Hotel

Bishop Lane

1840

Thomas Wardle

Royal Union

18 Bishop Lane

1846

David Holdsworth

Royal Union

17 Bishop Lane

1851

Robert Beedham

Royal Union

17 Bishop Lane

1858

H. Beedham

Union Inn

17 Bishop Lane

1861 (Census)

Robert Gruby

Union Coffee House

17 Bishop Lane

1863

J. B. Goodhall

Union Coffee House

17 Bishop Lane

1867-1904

Telegraph Inn (RH)

1874-76

William Lancaster

Telegraph Inn

17 Bishop Lane

1885

Samuel Bell

Telegraph Inn

17 Bishop Lane

1895

Elizabeth Whitfield

Telegraph Inn

17 Bishop Lane

1899-1901

Robert Ward

Telegraph Inn

17 Bishop Lane

1905-1922

Pioneer (RH)

1907

Henry W Shimman

Pioneer

17 Bishop Lane

1916

Harry Rutter

Pioneer

17 Bishop Lane

1921

J. E. Mulholland

Pioneer

17 Bishop Lane

There are some stray references to pubs in Bishop Lane as with most streets in Hull. Odd references are notoriously difficult to pin down. I have slotted a few in where I think they are most likely to have been but one has as yet escaped me. The Blue Ball, Bishop Lane was listed with victualler, Mrs.Dannat in the 1803 trade directory and was mentioned in the Hull Advertiser on the 30th April 1803.

This has become a work in progress as during the research I have found as many questions as answers and will need to return to the work when time permits.

1791 Hull Directory (Battle’s)

Bridges, Daniel*

M.D.

Denison, Thomas

surgeon

Durant, William

shoemaker

Hill, John

pawnbroker

Hodgson, John

tailor

Kirby, Robert

brandy merchant

Lewis, George*

painter

Lupton, Richard

wine merchant

Mancklin, Benjamin*

gent.

Martin & Rooth

wharfingers & agents

Thompson, John

ship owner

Thompson, Edward

wharfinger & agent (counting house)

Waltham, Joseph

victualler

Wray, William

gent.

Wray, John Esq.

Postmaster

*These residents were also present in 1780 according to the Poll Book of that year

1803 Hull Directory (Clayton’s)

Atkinson, William

cabinet maker 12?

Bainbridge, Robert

victualler, Blue Bell

Barner, John

bricklayer 14?

Bell, Robert

spermaceti candle maker

Blakeston & Harrison

seed & salt merchants, High St. r.Bishop Lane

Conyers, Robert

Patrington carrier

Dannat, Eleanor

victualler, Blue Ball

Davis, John

huckster

Doyle, Mrs.Elizabeth

gent.

Durant, William

cordwainer

Fitchet, Josiah Corthine

attorney at law & public notary

Hill, John

pawnbroker

Hook, John

gent

Kirby, Robert

liquor merchant

Lupton, R.

wine merchant

Macnamara, J.S.

merchant & agent

Martinson, John

shipbroker, r.Brook Street

Picard & Fardinando

attornies at law

Prudom, John

gent.

Rayner, John

huckster

Rispin, Richard

taylor (sic)

Rusling, Robert

cordwainer

Steele, Philip & Co.

merchants

Waring, William

principal clerk at the post-office

1806-7 Hull Directory (Battle’s)

Anderson, Robert

Patrington Post

Ashlin, George

day porter at Customs

Atkinson, William

music master 12?

Bainbridge, Robert

victualler (Blue Bell)

Barner, John

bricklayer 14?

Cowing, Leonard

tailor

Durant, William

cordwainer

Fardinando & Picard

attornies

Hill, John

pawnbroker

Kelwick, William

grocer

Lamb, William

cordwainer

Levy, Michael

silver smith

Manby, William

baker

Nichols, William

rope & rag merchant

Nicholson, William

ship & insurance broker

Nordblad & Haworth

merchants

Pearson, Christopher

second hand cloathes seller (sic)

Pindar, Benjamin

boat owner

Prudom, Mary

takes in boarders

Rusling, Robert

cordwainer

Sandwith, Robert

attorney & notary, public 23?

Singleleton, John

victualler

Twiddy, T

school master

Waring, William

principal clerk at the post-office

Wrigglesworth, John

lighterman

Elfstrand & Valley

merchants

1814 Hull Directory (Battle’s) south side only.

1 Capes, Thomas

victualler & broker (2?)

3 Billington, Henry

truckman

4 Large, Richard

bellman

5 Hook, Miss Ann

6 Usher, H N

solicitor

7 Smith, Samuel

victualler

8 Ward. Mrs Sarah

9 Levy, Joseph

watch maker

10 Anderson, John

solicitor

11 Garforth, Edward

solicitor

11 Hutchinson, Mrs Ann

12 Atkinson, William

music master

13 Westerdale, William

traveller

14 Barner, John

bricklayer

14 Watson, Peter William

merchant, ship owner, etc.

15 Manby, Mary

baker

16 Gray, Adolphus

victualler

16 Smith, William

victualler (should one of these read 17?)

19 Durant, William

subscription mill flour seller

19 Parker, Rd.

brazier, copper warehouse

1817 Hull Directory (Battle’s) south side only.

2 Macdonald, Angus

victualler

3 Broadley, widow

tailor

6 Usher, H N

solicitor

7 Jubb, William

victualler

12 Atkinson, William

music master

13 Jalland, William

solicitor

14 Barner, John

bricklayer

16 Wilson, William

victualler, Yorkshire Arms Tavern

17 Wood, John

gent.

18 Heward, Joseph

bread & ship biscuit maker

1851 Census

  1. Uninhabited * (30)
  2. Wm. Dunwell, innkeeper aged 48, family of 3 and servants. Also solicitor, printer and ropemaker.
  3. Louise Hewitt, aged 60, school mistress.
  4. Thos. White, breeches maker and glover and family of 3.
  5. Robert Burton, master shoemaker, family of 4, 1lodger and an apprentice.
  6. Rebecca Appleyard, accountant and a separate family of 3.
  7. illegible
  8. Wm Lloyd, coachpainter and his family of 8.
  9. John Riby, bankers clerk and housekeeper.
  10. Wm Dosser, yeast and flour dealer and s family members
  11. John Young, book binder and 6 family members
  12. Uninhabited
  13. Wm Stead, attorney
  14. George Retalic, music teacher
  15. illegible
  16. Elizabeth Conkerton, baker and 4 family members
  17. Robert Beadham, mariner, wife and 4 visitors

1861 Census

  1. Uninabited
  2. Queens Coffee House, Wm Dunwell and 3 lodgers
  3. Louisa Hewitt, family school mistress
  4. Wm Hanney, grocers shop and 1 border. Also Thos Swailes, billiard marker, wife and 3 children
  5. James Darley, master boat builder, wife and 6 children
  6. Julia Renshaw and 2 sons. Also Mary Lee and 3 children and Wm Lonsdale, baker and his wife.
  7. Hope & Anchor, Rosetta Ferguson victualler and 2 sons.
  8. Wm Good, engraver and copper plate printer.
  9. John Ribey, bankers clerk and 1 servant
  10. Sarah Dosser, flourdealer and 3 children

10½ Margaret Stephenson and 1son. (wife of a carver and guilder)
11 James Young, bookbinder and 3 family members
12 Uninhabited
13 Robert Southgate, seedcrushers foreman and wife
14 Elizabth Bricklebank, grocers shop and lodger. Also separate family of 3
15 uninhabited
16 uninhabited
17 Union Coffee House, Robert Gruby victualler, wife, 2 servants and 2 lodgers

Bishop Lane Staithe;
Kings Coffee House, John Park publican. Housekeeper, servant and 2 borders.
2,3,4,and 5 uninhabited
6 Mary Whitehead and 1 lodger.
7 uninhabited.

Notes
Made one-way in 1828.

Bibliography

A Collection of Statutes relating to the Town of Kingston upon Hull, etc., William Wooley. Simpkin & Marshall-London, Rees Davies-Hull, 1830.
A History of the English Public House, HA.Monckton. Bodley Head, London 1969.
A New Picture of Georgian Hull, Ivan and Elizabeth Hall. Wm.Sessions Ltd, York 1978/9. 
Dunwell’s Forge, High Street, Hull (a possible medieval timber-framed building?) unpublished MS, Christopher Ketchell. Hull College Local History Unit, 1996. 
Excavations at Chapel Lane Staith (East Riding Archaeologist Vol.5. 1979, Hull Old Town Report Series No.3) Brian Ayers. East Riding Archaeological Society, Hull 1979.
General and Concise History and Description of the Town and Port of Kingston upon Hull, J.J. Sheahan. John Green & Sons, Beverley 1864.
History of the Streets of Hull. J.Richardson (ed. W.Sykes), Malet Lambert re-print. Hull, 1980. 
Images of Victorian Hull (F.S. Smith’s Drawings of the Old Town). Carolyn Aldridge, Hull City Museums & Art Galleries and the Hutton Press. 1989. 
Inns, Alehouses and Drinking Customs of Old England. F.W.Hackwood, Bracken books. London 1985. 
Landlord. Graham Wilkinson, Unpublished manuscript. Hull, 2000 (work in progress). 
Last Orders Please. Richard Hayton, Local History Unit-Hull College.Hull, 1996. 
The Buildings of England. Yorkshire: York and the East Riding (second edition). Nikolaus Pevsner and David Neave, Penguin Books. London 1995.
The Changing Plan of Hull 1290-1650. Rosemary Horrox, Kingston upon Hull City Council. 1978. (Second corrected print of 1979)
The Construction and History of Medieval Timber-Framed Houses in England and Wales, Lachlan.
http://www.netcom.co.uk/~lachlan/timber.html
The English Inn Past & Present. A.E.Richardson & H.D.Eberlein, BT Batsford Ltd. London 1925.
Victoria History of the County of York, Vol.1, East Riding. Oxford University Press, London. 1969.

Plans consulted

40 High Street;

TAB/R-79.

Details of exits, regarding Public Houses Act of 1936. (Currently lost)

1894M/2128.

Plans for “club & restaurant”.

Bishop Lane;

BR4646 & BR4882.

Extension to “Bishop Lane Club” (completed 21.12.1970).

OB397.

Plan of unknown property dated 17.9.1856.for bookbinder 
Benjamin Crompton. (Number 11? - Check directories)

1929M/4767.

Plan of additional rear office at rear’ to Stewart’s Yard for
Speare & Thorpe Ltd, 5 Bishop Lane.

BR17368.

Plan for new office block conversion at 7,8 & 9 Bishop Lane for Worthshire Ltd. Completed 28.7.1975.

DBHT/6/8/29.

Description and valuation of Nos.15 & 16 Bishop Lane.
(Valued at £640 each in 1907)

1916M/2190.

Alterations to No.17 Bishop Lane o.b.o. Hull Incorporated Law Society.

P L Gibson 
Hull, May and June 2000 (edited January 2009)


  1. Changing Plan of Hull, see bibliog.
  2. VCH page 72.
  3. VCH page 74.
  4. The term Bishop became used as several properties once existed on the lane that belonged to the Archbishops of York.
  5. Richardson MS page 63.
  6. Excavations at Chapel Lane Staith- see bibliog.
  7. Horrox page 31.
  8. Horrox page 32
  9. Georgian Hull page 22.
  10. Pages 308-309- see bibliog.
  11. Hull City Archive.
  12. A History of the English Public House, Monckton, page 55.
  13. Ditto, page 74.
  14. Sheahan suggested it had been known “in living memory” as the King’s Coffee House, writing in 1863 this would suggest it had ceased to be known as such by then.
  15. Hull Daily Mail 13.5.01, “Pacific Club opening”.
  16. The Kelly’s trade directory of 1900, which would have been compiled in the latter part of 1899, listed “Site of New Pacific Club”. Cook’s 1901 trade directory gave no listing at all between No.39 and No.41.
  17. Humberside Executive Vol.6 issue 7, December 1977.
  18. Pevsner page 532.
  19. Was it the case that where other buildings are shown to straddle two plots, that this was indicative of property/land being owned on both sides of a lane or street?
  20. In its listed building description it is described as late 18th C.
  21. 1810-50, George III, cap.41.
  22. The listed building description of No.2 suggests it is much older than No.1 and is of the mid-18th Century.
  23. HO107/2362, 314-316. Hull Local Studies Library.
  24. RG9/3588, 94-96. Hull Local Studies Library.
  25. Landlord, GW.
  26. The Census was usually recorded on a Sunday when many occupiers of properties were either at their home address or visiting elsewhere. This gives the erroneous impression that some properties were actually uninhabited.
  27. Richard Hayton, Last Orders Please.
  28. Landlord, GW.
  29. The Poll Books showed residents by name and occupation only. However, it is likely that in a period of 11 years addresses would have remained fairly constant.
  30. Only at time of census, see previous note.


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